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SSSP Web site ready for action!

After a long and cloudy winter and spring, we've finally found time to get the Saskatchewan Summer Star Party 2006 (SSSP'06) website up and running.

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Saskatoon LPA Victory!

Mission Ridge Country Estates, located in the RM of Aberdeen, requested advice on limiting light pollution since they were interested in creating a country atmosphere where estates were not lit up like living in the city.

As as result, they adopted, verbatim, recommendations we provided.

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First Light for RASC Remote Observing Project

It's two o'clock in the morning. I'm observing under clear skies and my throat is sore. But not because of the cold! No, I'm sitting at my desk at home in London, Ontario, with a mug of hot chocolate. The telescope I'm using is southeast of Tucson, Arizona, at the Jarnac Observatory. The reason my throat is sore is that I've just spent 133min on the phone with RASC member David H. Levy (Honorary President of both Montreal Centre and Kingston Centre; 1980 Chant Medal winner), learning about David's web-based interface for remote observing.

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Astronomy Blog Contest - Winners!

Congratulations go out to our Astronomy Blog Contest winners as chosen by our President, Mary-Lou Whitehorne:

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RASC General Assembly Registration Now Open!

The 2012 General Assembly Organizing Committee is pleased to announce that the registration for the 2012 General Assembly is now open!

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Historical Minutes Online

Old minutes now on-line!

Through a collaboration between Randy Attwood, Peter Jedicke, and James Edgar, National Council Minutes from the early years of the Society are now on-line.

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The Sky This Month - September 2008

Pegasus – The Winged Horse

In mythology times, the winged horse Pegasus carried its master Perseus and rescued Andromeda to safety after Perseus saved her from the sea monster Cetus. This is a classic tale of heroism in the night sky. But for backyard astronomers and stargazers, The Great Square of Pegasus spells fall observing. This giant baseball diamond in the sky is quite easy to locate. With the splendid Milky Way perched straight up after sunset, the winged beast ascents in the east.

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The Sky This Month - September 2007

The Winged Horse

Looking like a giant celestial baseball diamond, the Great Square of Pegasus stands proudly in eastern skies. Mythology has it that Perseus the hunter, along with Andromeda who he recently saved from the sea monster Cetus, rode off on this winged beast. As early falls nights slowly announce themselves with earlier sunsets and cooler temperature keeping mosquitoes at bay, telescopes should be working overtime, as Pegasus is peppered with faint galaxies.

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The Sky This Month - September 2009

The Teapot’s Starry Steam

September nights are ideal for cruising the Milky Way. As the nights get progressively longer and cooler (less mosquitoes), we can now spend more quality time with the sky above. On moonless nights – the mighty planet Jupiter is the first to greet us in the south east within moments of sunset. Once you spot Jupiter, train your telescope on it. The contrasting blue sky allows viewing of subtle detail without eyestrain. Once darkness sets in and the planet brightens to magnitude -2.8, filters are required to soften the overpowering bright image.

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The Sky This Month - October 2008

Moving up the ecliptic.

Alas, short, warm, humid, buggy summer nights are now behind us, only to be replaced with longer, cooler, drier, autumn observing sessions without the hum of mosquitoes. This is the perfect time of year to enjoy the Milky Way high overhead when the sky darkens as well as many summer objects. As the last few months of 2008 tick on by, we will eventually lose sight of the galactic arms. This will also be the final curtain all to view Scorpius and Sagittarius in the south. The heart of our Milky Way Galaxy lies between these two southern icons.

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