RASC eNews

RSS   eNews RSS
Subscribe to our latest updates.

The Sky This Month - June 2008

Star Light…Star Bright

My favourite part of the day is sunset. As time marches on and if the sky is clear, I enjoy watching pastels of blue get progressively darker. As the sky is dimming, I try to catch stars as they start to show themselves one at a time. In June however, this game is short-lived as brilliant Arcturus is the first to pop out, barring the obvious Moon or bright planets. Referred to as the alpha star in the constellation Bootes (the herdsman), it is the third brightest star seen overall after of course the Sun. But if it already dark and you have trouble recognizing it for the first time, take the curved handle of the Big Dipper and follow as it arks to Arcturus. In fact, keep moving south with this curve and you stumble onto the bright star – Spica in the constellation Virgo. Spica is 15th on the list.

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - July 2009

The Mighty Hercules

In mythology, Hercules was known for his amazing courage and great strength. It is said this Greek warrior killed a lion with his bare hands. In the night sky, Hercules is the slayer of Hydra and was given an alternative name of Engonasin, meaning "on his knees" or "the Kneeler". To stargazers and astronomers, the asterism of Hercules consists of a dozen stars. However, our celestial strong man lacks significant star brightness and would hard press to identify this asterism from major light-polluted areas. The Kneeler is actually up sided down with his head pointing to the south and looks like a lopsided letter ‘H’. No less than 7 extrasolar planets have been found in this constellation. One of which is HD149026b

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - January 2009

More Than A Dozen Beacons


People often ask, “when is a good time to look at the stars”. Of course, I jokingly answer with a grin, “when it’s clear”.  After the chuckles subside, I continue to state, “any time of year – even winter”. The fear in their eyes when I mention the ‘W’ word, but yes it can be a great time to observe.


Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - February 2009

Giraffe of the North


Camelopardalis the giraffe, is one of those constellations that goes unnoticed for the most part. Lying close to Ursa Minor in the north, this constellation is circumpolar and is visible any time of year but lacks the WOW objects like those belonging to Orion, Andromeda.etc. Camelopardalis is spread over 757 square degrees of sky and is listed 18th in area. The Giraffe is home to 53 NGC objects, most of which are galaxies. As for bright stars, you would be out of luck. Most of its suns are in the fourth magnitude range.

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - December 2008

Night Of A 100 Clusters

 

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - December 2009

Perseus The Hero

With early sunsets, one can begin observing after supper hour; just don’t forget to help with the dishes. Rising high in the northeast is our Hero of the night. In last month’s article, we saw how Perseus saved Andromeda moments before she was to meet her fate with the Sea Monster Cetus.

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - August 2008

Our Galactic Veil


Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - August 2007

Two Main Events


If you are in the process of planning some vacation this month, make sure you set aside a few days for summer night observing. With the Milky Way in all its glory overhead as seen from the countryside, far from city light domes, you will want to stay up till the first sign of astronomical twilight begins. The observing window for this month in which the Moon will not interfere will be from August 8th to 16th with new Moon occurs on the 12th.


Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - August 2009

Beware the Scorpion


Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - April 2009

Looking Up To The Twins


Continue Reading

Pages