Northern Skies

The Sky This Month

Canis Major

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - February 2019

Gemini Twins

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - January 2019

The Total Lunar Eclipse

The year 2018 ended with two great celestial events. We had the Geminid meteor shower that peaked on the night of December 13/14 as well as the great appearance of Comet 46/P Wirtanen. The comet was closest to the earth on December 16 and was near the Pleiades star cluster. Wirtanen is now moving towards Ursa Major and fading rapidly.

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - December 2018

Two Grand Events

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - November 2018

Cassiopeia – The Queen

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - October 2018

Fall Nights

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - September 2018

Pegasus The Winged Horse

The constellation Pegasus is easily identified by its large square of stars. When rising in the east, its takes on the appearance of a giant baseball diamond. With 1,121 square degrees of sky Pegasus ranks 7th in overall size. It is also one of the original constellations listed by the astronomer Ptolemy back in the 2nd century.

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - August 2018

Draco The Dragon

Ursa Major places a key role in helping identify other constellations such as Ursa Minor and namely the North Star. Located between these two iconic asterisms is Draco the Dragon. Its overall size measures 1,083 square degrees of sky and ranks eighth largest overall. No less than fourteen stars make up the Dragon’s asterism which begins with its head situated above the constellation Hercules.  

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - July 2018

The Milky Way and Big Bold Mars

Opposed to the Big Dipper that is seen all year round, Sagittarius the Archer appears low in the south skies for only a few months. With so many celestial objects to hunt down, we definitely have our work cut out.

Continue Reading

The Sky This Month - June 2018

Bootes And Serpens

This month the constellation Bootes is high in the sky and just past the meridian. Its prominent star called Arcturus is 37 light years (ly) away and shines at zero magnitude. Simply follow the stars in the Big Dipper’s handle as it arcs down to Arcturus. This spectral class K0 supergiant shines 113 times brighter than our Sun measure 26 solar diameters across or one quarter the size of the orbit of Mercury.

Continue Reading

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Northern Skies