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planetarium

Ken Chilton #4

Ken Chilton #4

Ken Chilton with the McMaster University planetarium's projector.

McMaster Planetarium

McMaster Planetarium

Rev. Norman Green with the original McMaster Planetarium projector.

McLaughlin Planetarium

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McLaughlin Planetarium 1969

The McLaughlin Planetarium of the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Canada

The McLaughlin Planetarium opened to the public November 2, 1968. It took two years to build and cost $2,250,000. Among the largest and most modern planetariums in thw world, it was a gift to the Royal Ontario Museum for the people of Toronto and Ontario from R.S. McLaughlin of Oshawa, Ontario. Mr. McLaughlin, Chairman of the Board of General Motors of Canada, was a pioneer in the automobile industry.

Year: 
1969
Pages: 
4

QE Planetarium Brochure

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tn_QueenElizabethPlanetariumBrochure.jpg

Queen Elizabeth Planetarium brochure.

Year: 
1961
Pages: 
2

Peerless Planetarium

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Peerless45.jpg

The history of the modern planetarium in Canada goes back farther than we may be aware. Until the early 20th century the word 'planetarium' could be understood to mean several different types of instruments, that we might now recognize as orreries, planispheres, astronomical clocks, etc. One such was Wyld's Globe, a hollow sphere more than 18 metres wide. This functioned as an inverted globe of the Earth with geographical features modelled on the inside in plaster of Paris, with a scaffolding for paying visitors to climb up and study.

Year: 
1945
Pages: 
2

McMaster University Planetarium Opening

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McCallion Planetarium Opening

On 5 November 1949 the original planetarium at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario was publicly opened for the first time.  Armand Spitz, whose Spitz Laboratories had supplied the Model A-1 projection system, was a guest at the opening and spoke about 'The Value of Astronomy to the Layman.' Members of the Hamilton, Guelph and Toronto RASC centres, as well as the national RASC president Andrew Thomson, were also present. At the time, the dome above the projector was only a parachute hung from the ceiling, but the system was improved many times over the following years.

Year: 
1949
Pages: 
1
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