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Northern Skies

The Sky This Month - February 2012

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Written by Gary Boyle on
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Gary Boyle
Post Date: 
Thu, 2012/02/02

Winter Wonderland

It is great to see our parent star - the Sun making the news once again. It started with an active region labeled sunspot 1402 and the M-9 solar flare that blasted off the sun’s surface on January 22nd at 10:59 p.m. EST. From that point on, the explosion and expected grand aurora displays was talk on TV, radio and water coolers around the world. An astronomical event like this is a good catalyst on motivating people to learn more about the night sky.

 

WorldWide Starparty 2008

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Written by Gary Boyle, Ottawa on
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Gary Boyle, Ottawa
Post Date: 
Fri, 2008/09/05

Weather permitting, astronomers from different parts around the world will be broadcasting the moon, Jupiter and other celestial objects from their observatories over the internet. The WorldWide Star party 2008 will take place on Saturday September 6, 2008. I am scheduled to start broadcasting at 8 p.m. eastern time. Other time zones include a few stations across the USA as well as Australia to name a few. Looks like Sweden will be clouded out. In fact a few of the stations might suffer the same cloudy fate. Come join us in this unique event at:

http://www.deepsky.dk/WorldwideStarparty.asp

Asteroid Names with Canadian Connections

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Written by Peter Jedicke, London on
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Peter Jedicke, London
Post Date: 
Tue, 2006/06/27

The FAQ with the list of asteroid names with Canadian connections has been updated and can be seen at http://www.rasc.ca/faq/asteroids/home.htm. There are almost 200 asteroids on the list now!

SN in UGC07848 discovered from Osoyoos, BC

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Written by Alan Whitman, Okanagan on
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Alan Whitman, Okanagan
Post Date: 
Tue, 2006/05/02

Ajai Sehgal, Robert Gagliano and Tim Puckett, report the discovery of an apparent supernova (mag 17.8) (limiting mag 19.5) on CCD images taken with a 0.50-m reflector, Osoyoos , BC. On Apr. 28.36 UT. in the course of the Puckett Observatory Supernova Search. The new object was confirmed at mag 17.8 (limiting mag 19.3) by Puckett on Apr. 29.08, Ellijay, GA. 0.60-m reflector. The object is located at R.A. = 12h41m01s.55, Decl. = +63°31'11".6 (equinox 2000.0), which is 28".36 east and 0".6 south of UGC 7848. Nothing is visible at this location on images taken by Principal Investigator Tim Puckett on Apr. 5 (limiting mag 19.5).

First Light for RASC Remote Observing Project

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Written by Peter Jedicke, National Office on
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Peter Jedicke, National Office
Post Date: 
Wed, 2006/02/01

It's two o'clock in the morning. I'm observing under clear skies and my throat is sore. But not because of the cold! No, I'm sitting at my desk at home in London, Ontario, with a mug of hot chocolate. The telescope I'm using is southeast of Tucson, Arizona, at the Jarnac Observatory. The reason my throat is sore is that I've just spent 133min on the phone with RASC member David H. Levy (Honorary President of both Montreal Centre and Kingston Centre; 1980 Chant Medal winner), learning about David's web-based interface for remote observing.

The Sky This Month - September 2008

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Written by Gary Boyle, Ottawa on
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Gary Boyle, Ottawa
Post Date: 
Fri, 2008/09/05

Pegasus – The Winged Horse

In mythology times, the winged horse Pegasus carried its master Perseus and rescued Andromeda to safety after Perseus saved her from the sea monster Cetus. This is a classic tale of heroism in the night sky. But for backyard astronomers and stargazers, The Great Square of Pegasus spells fall observing. This giant baseball diamond in the sky is quite easy to locate. With the splendid Milky Way perched straight up after sunset, the winged beast ascents in the east.

The Sky This Month - September 2007

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Written by Gary Boyle, Ottawa on
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Gary Boyle, Ottawa
Post Date: 
Sun, 2007/09/02

The Winged Horse

Looking like a giant celestial baseball diamond, the Great Square of Pegasus stands proudly in eastern skies. Mythology has it that Perseus the hunter, along with Andromeda who he recently saved from the sea monster Cetus, rode off on this winged beast. As early falls nights slowly announce themselves with earlier sunsets and cooler temperature keeping mosquitoes at bay, telescopes should be working overtime, as Pegasus is peppered with faint galaxies.

The Sky This Month - September 2009

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Written by Gary Boyle, Ottawa on
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Gary Boyle, Ottawa
Post Date: 
Thu, 2009/09/03

The Teapot’s Starry Steam

September nights are ideal for cruising the Milky Way. As the nights get progressively longer and cooler (less mosquitoes), we can now spend more quality time with the sky above. On moonless nights – the mighty planet Jupiter is the first to greet us in the south east within moments of sunset. Once you spot Jupiter, train your telescope on it. The contrasting blue sky allows viewing of subtle detail without eyestrain. Once darkness sets in and the planet brightens to magnitude -2.8, filters are required to soften the overpowering bright image.

The Sky This Month - October 2008

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Written by Gary Boyle, Ottawa on
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Gary Boyle, Ottawa
Post Date: 
Fri, 2008/10/03

Moving up the ecliptic.

Alas, short, warm, humid, buggy summer nights are now behind us, only to be replaced with longer, cooler, drier, autumn observing sessions without the hum of mosquitoes. This is the perfect time of year to enjoy the Milky Way high overhead when the sky darkens as well as many summer objects. As the last few months of 2008 tick on by, we will eventually lose sight of the galactic arms. This will also be the final curtain all to view Scorpius and Sagittarius in the south. The heart of our Milky Way Galaxy lies between these two southern icons.

The Sky This Month - October 2007

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Written by Gary Boyle, Ottawa on
Author: 
Gary Boyle, Ottawa
Post Date: 
Wed, 2007/10/03

Milky Way (North)

We have all enjoyed the long months of summer, especially the awe inspiring views of the Milky Way Galaxy. This mystical glow of millions of distant suns now stands directly overhead as the sky darkens and sets before the break of dawn. This is also your last chance to catch Scorpius, the planet Jupiter and Sagittarius in that order, located in south-west skies.

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