Skip to main content

RASC eNews

RASC eNews

The Canadian Space Summit is an annual conference that brings together all elements of the Canadian space industry. In addition to displays, booths, and activities, the centerpiece of the Summit are two days of paper sessions covering a wide variety of topics. 2010 marks a year full of achievements, accolades and adventures. For more information visit www.css.ca.

It's high summer, the season of star parties, and the chance to show the public the Summer Triangle brightly set in the Milky Way, the radiants of outstanding meteor displays, and brilliant planetary conjunctions with your GLPs. With a little care we can all insure that the public remembers the celestial sights, and not GLP operator ineptitude leading to memorable but unplanned law enforcement interventions at star parties. The GLP Committee has prepared a poster to remind Society members of best practice and inform the public about GLP safety.

The GA 2010 open forum and panel discussion,

"BOLDLY NAVIGATING WHERE NO ONE HAS GONE BEFORE:
the future of the RASC in the 21st century"

is now a radio programme on Starizona's Let's Talk Stars, hosted by David & Wendee Levy (http://www.letstalkstars.com/).

Light Pollution Abatement Committee (LPAC) Chair Rob Dick was honored to have the LPAC committee approve unanimously the Dark Sky Preserve (DSP) designation for Kejimkujik National Park in southern Nova Scotia.

Link to the CBC announcement and reader discussions.

The flash motions from National Council meetings NC102 and 103, plus the motions from the Annual Meeting, are now on-line at http://www.rasc.ca/private/minutes/index.shtml

Ophiuchus, One Of The Originals

When the astronomer, mathematician and geographer Ptolemy drafted and introduced the original 48 constellations of the night sky to the world, Ophiuchus the Snake Holder made that famous list. Astrology depicts Ophiuchus holding a long snake that actually comprises two constellations – the snake’s head Serpens Caput on the west side and Serpens Cauda, the snake’s tail on the east side.

Draco – Circumpolar Beast

The dragon of the night is out there. Not behind the bushes at your favourite out of town dark observing site, nor is it hibernating in an isolated cave. The dragon of the night hangs high overhead, wrapped part way around Ursa Minor in the north. With our beasty friend located between the two celestial bears, it never appears to set. Constellations and stars that are visible all year round are called circumpolar.

Corvus The Crow

Spring is a wonderful time of year for many reasons. There is the annual planting of flowers, reseeding the lawn or even painting the house or apartment. It is also known in the astronomy community as galaxy season. With semi dark skies, these distant islands containing hundred of billions of stars each, stretch all the way from Ursa Major (the Big Dipper) in the north, down through Coma Berenices, ending at Virgo in the south. If hunting galaxies is your passion, you have come to the right place. Hundreds of objects stretch across ninety degrees of sky.

Go to http://www.rasc.ca/education/programs.shtml to find the important documents relating to the Public Speaker Programme—Programme outline, Application Procedure, and Application Form.

The first deadline of the year closed 2010 April 15.

Watch for the next advice late in June for the second-half of the year application period.

The Change of Seasons

Now that our Canadian snow has melted for the most part, we welcome in Spring with open arms. For obvious reasons, those that did not get to do much winter observing over the past months, it is now time to dust off those scopes and enjoy a handful of seasons in one night. As April begins, we find the constellation Orion the Hunter and his wintry friends low in western skies – ready to take the plunge into twilight.

Syndicate content