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RASC eNews

RASC eNews

Big Horns, Little Horns

Of the 88 constellations that divide our dear skies, 40 portray the starry outline of animals. Some appear warm and cuddly like Lepus the Hare or the majestic winged horse Pegasus while others seemed wild and ferocious like Ursa Majoris. At this time of year none is more dangerous than Taurus the Bull. With its prominent V shaped horns, thanks to the Hyades cluster located 150 light years from us, mythology paints the picture of the bull taking on Orion the Hunter in battle. The entire cluster spans some five degrees across with the prominent first magnitude star named Aldebaran.

Below are a couple of links from the Astronomy Society of the Pacific regarding welcoming (an re-welcoming?) members to meetings to help ease some of the awkwardness and assumptions regarding astronomy.

Help make new members feel welcomed and appreciated... we were all new at one time... A nice reminder regarding a mentor 'facilitator' as well.

The link is mentions "clubs" but it is also relevant to EPO activities!

Recent changes in National Office and tentative marketing and membership initiatives we are looking for a couple of members interested in participating in the development of the new RASC Marketing, Promotions, and Membership services.

Please contact Chris Weadick (MAP Chair) with any questions and request to help form part of the new RASC Strategy!

Thanks in advance
Chris Weadick
MAP Chair
chris.weadick @ gmail.com

Has your centre been doing outreach events? We’d love to have your information for future fund raising efforts. Now you can go online and report your numbers quickly and easily. It only takes a minute. Go to www.rasc.ca and click the link on the lower left hand side of our home page.

RASC member Tim Doucette is in the news again! Tim, a noted astrophotographer and visual observer, is legally blind. That, however, does not stop him from doing quality astronomy, and encouraging others to do the same through the RASC.

RASC members will be saddened to learn that one of our most distinguished contributors to the Observer's Handbook has recently passed away.

It is with sadness that we report the demise of RASC Honorary Member and distinguished planetary scientist, Audouin Dollfus. He was 85.

President Mary Lou Whitehorne gives clear and compelling reasons for supporting science, outreach, and education in the talk she gave at the Freericton GA in early July.

On Friday, Oct 15, from 3-4:00pm Eastern Time, astronomer Dr. Thomas Statler will give a remote, live tour of a modern astronomical telescope at the MDM Observatory in Arizona. This tour will give viewers an insight into practical astronomy, including how astronomers operate the telescope and how Dr. Statler's team is using it to study near-Earth asteroids.

Giddy Up Pegasus

Other than the familiar circle, a square is one of the easiest shapes to recognize. After all, it consists of four equal length sides with its corner measuring perfect 90-degree angles. If I were to ask you to point out a nonagon in the night sky, not knowing it is a nine-sided polygon with 140 degree inside angles, you would never find it. However, you would have better luck with the common square.

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