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The Illusive Crab

If I were to hand the average person a star chart of the constellation Cancer the Crab and asked them to find it in the sky, I am sure they would be hard pressed in identifying it. Unlike bright celestial patterns such as Orion, the Big Dipper and so on, Cancer is not the easiest to recognize. However to the seasoned astronomer who know the sky like the back of their hand, Cancer is flanked with the Gemini Twins to its west and Leo (Major) the Lion to its east. Both of these bordering constellations possess bright suns.

To all RASC members:

I am pleased to announce that the first round of funding for 2010 under the newly formed Public Speaker Programme (PSP) is now available.

Chasing the Hare

The night sky as is a theatrical stage of mythological characters, unique stories of how they interaction with others. Amongst the wintry constellations is Lepus the Hare. Although Orion the Hunter is poised in battle with Taurus the Bull, he also liked to hunt our long eared friend.

Star Renewal

It is sometimes hard to convey the feeling of standing under a moonless winter sky. Distant suns of Orion, Taurus, Auriga, Gemini as well as Canis Minor and Major are bright, crisp and overall – mesmerizing. Other than following the nightly dance of the Moon as it orbits Earth or tracking the planets as they slide across the familiar constellations along the ecliptic, one might think that is all that changes in the galaxy. But our Milky Way Galaxy, with its population of an estimated two hundred billion stars is changing. It is the time scale that is the key factor.

To my colleagues at The Royal Astronomical Society of Canada,

I wish to express my sincere appreciation of your participation in National Science and Technology Week (NSTW) 2009. Together, we made this year's NSTW a tremendous success. With over 200 organizations celebrating science and technology in a diverse variety of ways, we nearly tripled the number of participating organizations over last year.

Perseus The Hero

With sunset nice and early this time of year, one can begin observing after supper hour; just don’t forget to help with the dishes. Rising high in the north east is our Hero of the night. In last month’s article we saw how Perseus saved Andromeda moments before she was to meet her fate with the Sea Monster Cetus.

Rick Stankiewicz of the Peterborough Astronomical Association is creating cover envelopes commemorating IYA2009 and the DDO. If you are interested, see Rick's details at www.peterboroughastronomy.com or contact him directly:

(705) 295-6158 Evening
(705) 755-1807 Day
stankiewiczr @ nexicom . net
RASC Member (Unattached)

"Stars Up! Lights Down! Support light pollution abatement in your community!"

The Minutes from National Council meeting NC094, 2009 November 21, as both PDF and html files, are now placed on the National Council Web site at http://www.rasc.ca/council/minutes

Bear in mind that these are not yet approved by National Council, so consider than portions may be changed after approval at the next National Council meeting.

In addition, the Motions stemming from that meeting are provided as a text file http://www.rasc.ca/system/files/private/minutes20091121_0.pdf

James Edgar
Recorder

Find new instructions on how to access the private areas of the RASC's web services are here http://www.rasc.ca/loginfaq.shtml

The Legend Continues

Throughout time, the winged horse Pegasus has appeared in many different mythological stories and legends. One of the most famous tales is the “Royal Family of Constellations” where Perseus the hero rescues Andromeda the maiden from the sea monster Cetus. Upon slaying the monster, Perseus and Andromeda ride the winged horse into the sunset.

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