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The Sky This Month - September 2018

Pegasus The Winged Horse

The constellation Pegasus is easily identified by its large square of stars. When rising in the east, its takes on the appearance of a giant baseball diamond. With 1,121 square degrees of sky Pegasus ranks 7th in overall size. It is also one of the original constellations listed by the astronomer Ptolemy back in the 2nd century.

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New Youth Outreach Coordinator position announced

Recently the RASC successfully obtained a grant from the Trottier Foundation.

The grant is $75,000 a year for three years. The money is to be used to hire a Youth Outreach Coordinator.

The job was posted Friday on the Charity Village website

https://charityvillage.com/app/job-listings/714d3ff1-25a2-e811-80d3-14187768272a?search=true

 

Attracting younger people to join the Society has long been a challenge.

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The Sky This Month - August 2018

Draco The Dragon

Ursa Major places a key role in helping identify other constellations such as Ursa Minor and namely the North Star. Located between these two iconic asterisms is Draco the Dragon. Its overall size measures 1,083 square degrees of sky and ranks eighth largest overall. No less than fourteen stars make up the Dragon’s asterism which begins with its head situated above the constellation Hercules.  

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The Sky This Month - July 2018

The Milky Way and Big Bold Mars

Opposed to the Big Dipper that is seen all year round, Sagittarius the Archer appears low in the south skies for only a few months. With so many celestial objects to hunt down, we definitely have our work cut out.

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The Sky This Month - June 2018

Bootes And Serpens

This month the constellation Bootes is high in the sky and just past the meridian. Its prominent star called Arcturus is 37 light years (ly) away and shines at zero magnitude. Simply follow the stars in the Big Dipper’s handle as it arcs down to Arcturus. This spectral class K0 supergiant shines 113 times brighter than our Sun measure 26 solar diameters across or one quarter the size of the orbit of Mercury.

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2018 Elections Update

!!! 2018 ELECTIONS UPDATE !!!

Craig Levine, our Society’s Past President, has advised that he will be ending his 3 year Director’s term 1 year early at the General Assembly in Calgary. Craig has served on the Board of Directors for 4 years now, including a term as President, after 6 busy years on National Council. On behalf of the Society and all of its Members, we wish Craig all the best and thank him for 10 years of service at the Society level of the RASC.

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Open House Highlights

Over 50 people attended the RASC Archive History Centre Open House on Saturday May 12.

Local Member of Parliament James Maloney attended and announced that the RASC would receive funding for two summer students this year. The students will carry our various administrative assignments to enhance fundraising and RASC Centre public outreach activities.

The new RASC Archive History Centre.

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The Sky This Month - May 2018

A Time For Galaxies

The most abundant celestial objects to hunt are galaxies. Of the estimated two trillion galaxies that make up the known universe, the average telescope has the ability to see only a small tiny of this number. The New General Catalogue (NGC) contains 7,840 objects with more that 80% being galaxies. Mind you, the catalogue encompasses both north and south hemispheres.

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New Archive History Centre Open House

RASC Archive Open House: Join Us!

Who? RASC Members and their guests.

When? Saturday May 12, 2018

Where? 4920 Dundas St W, Unit 203

Time? 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Note: Guests are welcome to drop-in and stay for any length of time!

 

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The Sky This Month - April 2018

Hydra

Hydra is the largest constellation in the night sky measuring 104 arc minutes in length and takes up 1,303 square degrees in area. This constellation is dotted with numerous galaxies, nebulae and star clusters

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