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RASC eNews

RASC eNews

Old minutes now on-line!

Through a collaboration between Randy Attwood, Peter Jedicke, and James Edgar, National Council Minutes from the early years of the Society are now on-line.

Through a collaboration between Randy Attwood, Peter Jedicke, and James Edgar, National Council Minutes from the early years of the Society are now on-line.

In the past few days, Minutes from 1910 to 1934 were placed in the National Web Site to join part of the on-going project where historical archives are being scanned, put through an OCR (Optical Character Recognition) process, proofread, and then saved in both html and PDF format for easy access by all.

Many of our nightly constellations are bright enough to be located from semi urban areas without problem. On the other hand, practice does make perfect when trying to spot dimmer groups such as Cancer the Crab, the Little Dipper along with other fainter shapes. However, when it comes to Canis Major – one of Orion’s hunting dogs, there is no denying as to its locating in the sky.

The RASC National Library and Archives are winnowing out materials that are deemed surplus. These items are being offered on a priority basis to Centres and members.

The Halifax Centre will celebrate International Astronomy Week by presenting talks at the Halifax Public Library as follows:

The University of Toronto Astronomy and Space Exploration Society presents their Fourth Annual Symposium: Expanding Canada's Frontiers: The Search for Life

A Winter Wonderland

Happy New Year everyone. Hope there were astro presents under the Christmas tree with your name on them. If so and for those of you that already have a telescope or even binoculars, January night skies await. Stepping outdoors on the next clear moonless night, your eyes immediately pick up the brilliant suns of Auriga, Gemini, Orion and Taurus. Eighteen of the brightest stars occupy these constellations and give the wintry sky a magical appearance.

A new newsletter is now available from the Coalition for Canadian Astronomy highlighting progress with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the Thirty-Metre Telescope and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). [Ed. A cope was formerly available in the CASCA Astronomy News NOV 2006, which is no longer found].

Le Bulletin de la Coalition pour l'astronomie canadienne est maintenant disponible grâce de CASCA. Cette numéro souligne des nouvelles concernant le radio télescope international du 21ième siècle (le Square Kilometre Array ou SKA), le Télescope de trente mètres et le grand réseau millimétrique de l’Atacama (Atacama Large Millimeter Array, ALMA).

Some Pretty Cool Galaxies

Public star parties are a great place to show the wonders of the night sky to children and adults alike. One of the most frequently asked questions asked is, you guessed it, “how far can you see with this telescope”? In response the term light year is defined as a rounded off figure of ten trillion kilometres. Turning our instruments skywards to a faint smudge, we rattle off the estimated distance (in light years) we have previously read in books or found on web sites. With distances of nebulae and star clusters are listed in the thousands of light years category while residing in our Milky Way Galaxy, however, remote galaxies would be the correct answer.

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