Skip to main content

RASC eNews

RASC eNews

The Bear and the Dog

With spring now upon us, nature is joyfully coming out of hibernation. Warmer weather settles in as animals such as the bear awaken from their winter slumber. Just like its shaggy hair cousin, the great celestial bear is up and about in northern skies. Even though it is circumpolar meaning it never sets, the Big Dipper in nicely overhead all night long.

The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) will be a global celebration of astronomy and its contributions to society and culture, stimulating worldwide interest not only in astronomy, but in science in general, with a particular slant towards young people. IYA2009 will mark Galileo Galilei’s first use of the telescope for astronomical observations, and will portray astronomy as a peaceful global scientific endeavour that unites astronomers in an international, multicultural family of scientists working together to find answers to some of the most fundamental questions that humanity has ever asked.

The Niagara Centre is hosting their annual banquet on Saturday, April 14th, 2007 from 6:00 p.m. onwards. All RASC members are encouraged to take in this exciting event that will feature Paul Delaney of the Department of Physics and Astronomy at York University.

Jaymie Matthews, member of the Vancouver Centre and Associate Professor in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at the University of British Columbia was appointed to the Order of Canada by Governor General Michaëlle Jean on February 20th. The Society congratulates Mr. Matthews, OC on this honour which was effective October 5, 2006.

Finally – A Lunar Eclipse

The typical wall calendar shows that this March 3rd will be a full moon other wise known as the Wolf Moon, and is scheduled to rise 5:50 p.m. locally. However, the magic to this event is the moon will be completely immersed in the earth’s shadow – a total lunar eclipse. Mid totality when the moon is deepest in our planet’s shadow, will occur at 6:21 p.m. (Eastern) after which the Moon will begin to slowly slide from the zone of darkness.

Canada's time-signal station, CHU, is now making the following brief announcement during even-numbered minutes: "CHU has been licensed to continue broadcasting on 7.335 MHz." (The same message is heard in French during odd-numbered minutes.) To those who made known your concerns to the National Research Council regarding the possible loss of this valuable transmission—on a frequency best heard at night, when astronomers dabble in their "occult phenomena"—the effort appears to have succeeded.

A new year has brought much success to The Puckett Observatory World Supernova Search. With over 10 Canadians on the team there has been a steady flow over the last few years of announcements involving those members in discoveries. Last year the international team discovered 29 supernovae, this was considered to be a slow year!

Old minutes now on-line!

Through a collaboration between Randy Attwood, Peter Jedicke, and James Edgar, National Council Minutes from the early years of the Society are now on-line.

Through a collaboration between Randy Attwood, Peter Jedicke, and James Edgar, National Council Minutes from the early years of the Society are now on-line.

In the past few days, Minutes from 1910 to 1934 were placed in the National Web Site to join part of the on-going project where historical archives are being scanned, put through an OCR (Optical Character Recognition) process, proofread, and then saved in both html and PDF format for easy access by all.

Many of our nightly constellations are bright enough to be located from semi urban areas without problem. On the other hand, practice does make perfect when trying to spot dimmer groups such as Cancer the Crab, the Little Dipper along with other fainter shapes. However, when it comes to Canis Major – one of Orion’s hunting dogs, there is no denying as to its locating in the sky.

Syndicate content