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Mars 195811022130

Mars 195811022130

1958 November 2 @ 21:30 EST, seeing 4. South is approximately up.

Drawings made through a 10" f/7.2 Newtonian. Power 150. Seeing in Pickering's scale; 5 is the best we ever have here. Polar region marked in dotted line: glimpses and doubtful. Time: EST.
Location: N.Lat. 45°17'31", W.Long. 72°33'02"; elev.: 650 feet
Address: S.A. Zielinski, Fulford, Que.

Mars 195811012200

Mars 195811012200

1958 November 1 @ 22:00 EST, seeing 5. South is approximately up.

Drawings made through a 10" f/7.2 Newtonian. Power 150. Seeing in Pickering's scale; 5 is the best we ever have here. Polar region marked in dotted line: glimpses and doubtful. Time: EST.
Location: N.Lat. 45°17'31", W.Long. 72°33'02"; elev.: 650 feet
Address: S.A. Zielinski, Fulford, Que.

Mars 195811072100

Mars 195811072100

1958 November 7 @ 21:00, seeing 3-4. South is approximately up.

Drawings made through a 10" f/7.2 Newtonian. Power 150. Seeing in Pickering's scale; 5 is the best we ever have here. Polar region marked in dotted line: glimpses and doubtful. Time: EST.
Location: N.Lat. 45°17'31", W.Long. 72°33'02"; elev.: 650 feet
Address: S.A. Zielinski, Fulford, Que.

Castlefield Observatory Sketch

Castlefield Observatory Sketch

Bert Topham's Castlefield Observatory in Toronto, at the end of its life.

Sketch by Eugene Fedorenko (Toronto Centre).

Photos of this observatory from the RASC Archives.

A short bio on Bert Topham (1893-1962) appears on page 148 of Looking Up.

Note from Geoff Gaherty:

Thomas Wright's 1769 transit observations at Île aux Coudres, Lower Canada

Thomas Wright's 1769 transit observations at Île aux Coudres, Lower Canada

Thomas Wright published his successful transit observations, complete with a full disc image of the course of Venus on the Sun, and sunspots, in the Royal Society's Philosophical Transactions, vol. 59 (1769), 273-280. This is a recreation of an 18th-century manuscript copy of his report. Image courtesy of Specula astronomica minima (©Specula astronomica minima).

Meteor Procession 1913

Meteor Procession 1913

The Great Meteor Procession (GMP) of 1913 February 9 was one of the most remarkable astronomical events to be inscribed in the astronomical record. That evening (ca. 21:05 EST at Toronto) the sky lit up with a procesison of slowly moving meteors (NW to SE). Estimates in reports state there were anywhere from 3 to 50 separate groups of meteors, with the number of meteors ranging from 15 up to the 1000s.

Sunspot 18901130

Sunspot 18901130

A sunspot as seen on 1890 November 30th, as sketched by A.F. Miller.

This was scanned from the original at RASC national office.

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