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Map Showing Wales' & Dymond's 1769 Transit Station

Map Showing Wales' & Dymond's 1769 Transit Station

This retrospective map in 18th-century style shows the general location of William Wales' and Joseph Dymond's transit of Venus station, where they wintered over in 1768-1769. Image courtesy of Specula astronomica minima (©Specula astronomica minima).

Newfoundland 1761 - trials of a June Transit

Newfoundland 1761 - trials of a June Transit

Professor John Winthrop, Harvard College’s Hollisian Professor of Mathematics and Philosophy, successfully observed the 1761 transit from "Venus Hill", now thought to be somewhere in the vicinity of St. John's (Kenmount Hill?).

Thomas Wright's 1769 transit observations at Île aux Coudres, Lower Canada

Thomas Wright's 1769 transit observations at Île aux Coudres, Lower Canada

Thomas Wright published his successful transit observations, complete with a full disc image of the course of Venus on the Sun, and sunspots, in the Royal Society's Philosophical Transactions, vol. 59 (1769), 273-280. This is a recreation of an 18th-century manuscript copy of his report. Image courtesy of Specula astronomica minima (©Specula astronomica minima).

Thomas Wright's 1769 ToV observing station at Île aux Coudres, Lower Canada

Thomas Wright's 1769 ToV observing station at Île aux Coudres, Lower Canada

Thomas Wright, Deputy Surveyor of the Northern District of America, observed the 1769 transit of Venus successfully from Île aux Coudres in the Saint Lawrence River, Quebec. The quality of his observations was praised by the Astronomer Royal, the Rev'd Neville Maskelyne, in the pages of the Royal Society's Philosophical Transactions. Unbeknownst to both Wright and Maskelyne, the Île aux Coudres transit station was slap in the middle of an ancient meteorite impact site, the Charlevoix crater. This drawing is a recreation of the island site in 1769.

drawing of the black drop

drawing of the black drop

Recreation of 18th-century drawing of the black drop effect. Image courtesy of Specula astronomica minima (©Specula astronomica minima).

1769 ToV portable observatory Hudson Bay

1769 ToV portable observatory Hudson Bay

Recreation of the pre-fab observatory brought to the Prince of Wales transit of Venus station by William Wales and Joseph Dymond. The observatory was designed by John Smeaton, the "father of civil engineering". Note the ice; according to the observers, the extreme cold was a challenge. Image courtesy of Specula astronomica minima (©Specula astronomica minima).

ToV parallax

ToV parallax

Image courtesy of Specula astronomica minima (©Specula astronomica minima).

ToV orbital conditions

ToV orbital conditions

Image courtesy of Specula astronomica minima (©Specula astronomica minima).

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